Non-Technological Universal Coherence

Part of The Universal Coherence.

Linked from Introduction: Singularity Time Loop, Accelerating Coherence, Universal Unity, Jungian Synchronicity.

We can back up, though, and talk about concepts similar to universal coherence as they existed prior to the idea that some kind of advanced technological force tied it together.  One ancient one is Indra’s Net, though there are other classical examples like ancient Greek cosmopolitanism:

Far away in the heavenly abode of the great god Indra, there is a wonderful net which has been hung by some cunning artificer in such a manner that it stretches out infinitely in all directions. In accordance with the extravagant tastes of deities, the artificer has hung a single glittering jewel in each “eye” of the net, and since the net itself is infinite in dimension, the jewels are infinite in number. There hang the jewels, glittering “like” stars in the first magnitude, a wonderful sight to behold. If we now arbitrarily select one of these jewels for inspection and look closely at it, we will discover that in its polished surface there are reflected all the other jewels in the net, infinite in number. Not only that, but each of the jewels reflected in this one jewel is also reflecting all the other jewels, so that there is an infinite reflecting process occurring.

It’s one of the most classical illustrations of the idea of everything being connected.  While this is perhaps a somewhat idealist concept, it’s also a good description of dialectical materialism, the idea that everything forms a totality through natural and social systems, whether ecosystems or global markets or otherwise.

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Similarly, the idea of all phenomena in a person’s life being meaningful through a unity with an authorial all-source through cycles of reincarnation is substantiated by material rather than religious concepts.

In the same way that reincarnation is not so much a divine order as a crude eternal recurrence based on statistical probability of matter going through the same motions after a long enough time, the emergence of a meaningful universe is not a matter of faith but of rational probability.  This was a particular focus of the atheist Nietzsche.

As Heinreich Heine wrote,

[T]ime is infinite, but the things in time, the concrete bodies, are finite. They may indeed disperse into the smallest particles; but these particles, the atoms, have their determinate numbers, and the numbers of the configurations which, all of themselves, are formed out of them is also determinate. Now, however long a time may pass, according to the eternal laws governing the combinations of this eternal play of repetition, all configurations which have previously existed on this earth must yet meet, attract, repulse, kiss, and corrupt each other again…

materialism idealism

Alan Watts explained it beautifully, in terms that are religiously phrased but are also quite compatible with a secular materially cycling universe (but which becomes divine when you realize how it connects human consciousness with the totality).

“When children ask me those fundamental metaphysical questions which come so readily to their minds — “Where did the world come from?” “Why did God make the world?” “Where was I before I was born?” “Where do people go when they die?” — again and again I have found that they seem to be satisfied with a simple and very ancient story, which goes something like this:

“There was never a time when the world began, because it goes round and round like a circle, and there is no place on a circle where it begins. Look at my watch, which tells the time; it goes round, and so the world repeats itself again and again. But just as the hour-hand of the watch goes up to twelve and down to six, so, too, there is day and night, waking and sleeping, living and dying, summer and winter. You can’t have any one of these without the other, because you wouldn’t be able to know what black is without white, or white unless side-by-side with black.

“In the same way, there are times when the world is, and times when it isn’t, for if the world went on and on without rest for ever and ever, it would get horribly tired of itself. It comes and it goes. Now you see it; now you don’t. So because it doesn’t get tired of itself, it always comes back again after it disappears. It’s like your breath: it goes in and out, in and out, and if you try to hold it in all the time you feel terrible. It’s also like the game of hide-and-seek, because it’s always fun to find new ways of hiding, and to seek for someone who doesn’t always hide in the same place.

“God also likes to play hide-and-seek, but because there is nothing outside of God, he has no one but himself to play with. But he gets over this difficulty by pretending that he is not himself. This is his way of hiding from himself. He pretends that he is you and I and all the people in the world, all the animals, all the plants, all the rocks, and all the stars. In this way he has strange and wonderful adventures, some of which are terrible and frightening. But these are just like bad dreams, for when he wakes up they will disappear.

“Now when God plays hide and pretends that he is you and I, he does it so well that it takes him a long time to remember where and how he hid himself. But that’s the whole fun of it — just what he wanted to do. He doesn’t want to find himself too quickly, for that would spoil the game. That is why it is so difficult for you and me to find out that we are God in disguise, pretending not to be himself. But when the game has gone on long enough, all of us will wake up, stop pretending, and remember that we are all one single Self — the God who is all that there is and who lives for ever and ever.

“Of course you must remember that God isn’t shaped like a person. People have skins and there is always something outside our skins. If there weren’t, we wouldn’t know the difference between what is inside and outside our bodies. But God has no skin and no shape because there isn’t any outside to him. The inside and outside of God are the same. And though I have been talking about God as ‘he’ and not ‘she,’ God isn’t a man or a woman. I didn’t say ‘it’ because we usually say ‘it’ for things that aren’t alive.

“God is the Self of the world, but you can’t see God for the same reason that, without a mirror, you can’t see your own eyes, and you certainly can’t bite your own teeth or look inside your head. Your self is that cleverly hidden because it is God hiding.

“You may ask why God sometimes hides in the form of horrible people, or pretends to be people who suffer great disease and pain. Remember, first, that he isn’t really doing this to anyone but himself. Remember, too, that in almost all the stories you enjoy there have to be bad people as well as good people, for the thrill of the tale is to find out how the good people will get the better of the bad. It’s the same as when we play cards. At the beginning of the game we shuffle them all into a mess, which is like the bad things in the world, but the point of the game is to put the mess into good order, and the one who does it best is the winner. Then we shuffle the cards once more and play again, and so it goes with the world.”

— On the Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are, Alan Watts

Finally, we encounter one last iteration of universal coherence in Marx’s Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts in describing the philosophical-material convergent-significance of what the actual occurrence of communism would mean:

This communism, as fully developed naturalism, equals humanism, and as fully developed humanism equals naturalism; it is the genuine resolution of the conflict between man and nature and between man and man – the true resolution of the strife between existence and essence, between objectification and self-confirmation, between freedom and necessity, between the individual and the species. Communism is the riddle of history solved, and it knows itself to be this solution.

Next: Universal Coherence as a Life Philosophy

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